Chemical Reactions

Making homemade plastic science experiment

Making homemade plastic Yep, we're surrounded by plastic.  Sit right there and look around the room and see if you can spot something made of plastic.  See, I told you so. The keys on your keyboard are made of plastic.  The mouse you've got your hand resting on is made of plastic.   Even parts of the monitor you're looking at right now is made of plastic ( Reeko,  I don't know how you know all these things but stop it - it's giving me the creeps). These plastics can be either natural plastics which are made of materials such as wax or natural rubber, or they can be synthetic plastics which are made from polyethylene or nylon.  Most plastic is made of petroleum oil.  The…
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Chemical Reactions

Magic balloon egg

Magical fun with eggs If you're the type of person who finds yourself shouting, "I want and I want it NOW" then this experiment might not be for you. It'll take 10 days to see the results of our experiment but when all is said and done, we'll have one of the weirdest eggs you've ever seen. Magicians have created eggs like the one we're about to make, for many years. As early as 1900, magicians created these "magic eggs" and used them as props in a variety of magic tricks. Imagine if you could remove the "hardness" from an egg shell giving you an egg that could be folded like a napkin or blown up like a balloon? The egg could be folded to…
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Chemical Reactions

Look out, she’s gonna blow!

The infamous baking soda volcano experiment Now we're going to get a little messy. In this experiment we build a real working volcano. After mixing just the right amount of ingredients together, we'll add the final item to make our volcano 'blow its top' spewing red lava down the sides.  Yes, this is the famous “Baking Soda Volcano” experiment - found exclusively at Reeko’s Mad Scientist Lab (and on the websites of the millions of Reeko’s minion slaves). First we need to create the 'salt dough'. Mix 6 cups flour, 2 cups salt, 4 tablespoons cooking oil, and 2 cups of water in a large bowl. Work the ingredients with your hands until smooth and firm. Add more water to the mixture if needed. Stand…
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Chemical Reactions

Happy, dancing raisins

Carbonated water makes for happy, dancing raisins Remember the dancing raisins commercial on TV? No? Well it doesn't matter anyway, they have absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with this science experiment. Now, let's make some raisins boogie! Fill a glass or bottle half full of carbonated water. Drop three or four raisins into the carbonated water. Wait around for the show to What happens? Can you guess why the raisins bob to the surface? Carbonated water contains dissolved carbon dioxide gas. This gas will collect on the uneven surfaces on the raisins. When enough gas has collected, it will actually lift the raisins to the surface (kind of like little tiny parachutes) where the gas is then released into the air. With the gas now…
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Chemical Reactions

Elephant Toothpaste

Help an elephant with those 9-pound molars So you don’t want to be a kid and instead want to be an elephant because Reeko said elephants never have to brush their teeth? Well Reeko has news for you – there’s a lot more differences between kids and elephants than just their teeth. If you don’t believe that, try picking one up. Imagine being an elephant and always loosing at hide and seek. Even when dressed in yellow and disguised as a banana they are easy to find in a crowd. They are large, gray, and wrinkly. And when they do brush their teeth – well, those are 9 pound molars they have to deal with. Now that we have your elephant yearnings out of the…
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Chemical Reactions

Blow up balloon

Blow up balloon with baking soda and vinegar When vinegar is mixed with baking soda, a double replacement reaction takes place. The end result is carbon dioxide but behind the scenes, there is more than one reaction taking place. Put a tablespoon of backing soda on to the center of a paper towel. Fold the paper towel over the baking soda a few times. The objective is to create a “time release” mechanism for our reaction. Pour ½ cup vinegar into a plastic bag. Pour ¼ cup warm water into the back with the vinegar. Hold the baking soda filled paper towel in the mouth of the plastic bag by pinching the sides to hold it. Don’t let the paper towel touch the solution yet.…
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Chemical Reactions

Amazing melting properties of salt

How and why salt melts ice Ever wonder why people pour salt on icy sidewalks to make the snow melt? Usually the result is a big pile of slush made of melted snow and ice crystals. And why do the lakes and streams freeze over solid while the ocean always remains flowing? Is there something magical about salt? Are there other uses for salt other than flavoring our food and raising our blood pressure? Let's try this experiment and see for ourselves. Test #1: Take 2 cups of water. Place about a tablespoon of salt in one of the cups. Place both cups in the freezer. Check each cup about every 10 minutes. Can you guess which one will freeze first?   Test #2: Now…
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Atomic/Electric

Waxing poetic – soda can, balloon, and static electricity experiment

NEWSFLASH - Soft drink cans HATE balloons! How many times have you snickered at Dad walking around the house with a sock stuck to his back? Or watched as he ran his hand up his shirt to scratch and pulls out one of those antistatic dryer sheets? The reason these items sticks to Dad has nothing to do with his popularity in the laundry world. It’s simply due to the fact that the laundry items are chock full of electrons and Dad, well, he’s just not. Take a soda can and lay it on its side on a smooth flat surface. Now rub the balloon back and forth on the top of your head. Yes, Reeko agrees that you look pretty silly rubbing that balloon…
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Atomic/Electric

Piezo Explosive Popper

Piezo Explosive Popper Kids love things that go boom. Throw in some flames and you've got one of the most popular experiments in Reeko's Mad Scientist Lab. The piezo popper, also known as the film cannon, binaca bomb, or photo flash, lets us release energy from a rapidly combusting fuel-air mixture and use that expanding air to blow the top off a film canister. The force of the mini-explosion will be so great that we'll be able to propel the canister over 3 stories in the air! Take apart the fireplace lighter and look for the "igniter" part. The igniter is the "clicker" mechanism and will have a button that is pressable and two metal connection points. The clicker button will be used to trigger…
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Atomic/Electric

Making Sparks – Part II

Making Sparks - Part II Ever heard of a Leyden jar?  It's been around for over 200 years and is the forerunner of the modern day capacitor.  The guy who invented it tested it on himself and stated that 'my whole body was shaken as though by a thunderbolt'.  And no, his name wasn't Leyden - Leyden was the town that the jar was invented in.  If we had named the jar after the inventor it would be called a 'Musschenbroeck jar' (now you see why it's called a Leyden jar).  It was once discharged through seven hundred monks who were holding hands.  They flew up into the air simultaneously.  Definitely sounds like a experiment Dad should be involved By the way, you might want…
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