Physics and math

Listen up. Scientist create sound so loud, it instantly boils water

Bang your head! Scientists at Stanford University created a sound that measures a whopping 270 decibels. The sound was created underwater and is believed to be the limit of how loud a sound can be. Ready to put on a pair of earplugs and give the sound a listen? Not so fast. Scientists say earplugs would do no good. The sound is so loud, eardrums, heart, lungs, and other internal organs would instantly rupture.
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Space

For the first time, scientists have captured a picture of a black hole in space and it’s amazing!

Astronomers have done what was thought to be impossible – they captured the unseeable, a picture of a black hole, an object so dense, nothing, not even light, can escape it. The photo was taken by scientists at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The picture of the black hole shows a lopsided ring of light surrounding a dark circle – the black hole itself. The black hole is in a galaxy known as Messier 87 in the constellation Virgo. The black hole is 55 million light years away from earth. That is so far, if you hopped a ride on the Space Shuttle, it would take you 20,450,000 years to reach it. Here's what messier 87 looks like through a telescope. To capture the image…
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Physics and math

Why do grapes in a microwave burst into brilliant, violent, white flames? It’s plasma, baby!

Cut a grape in half but leave the skin of one side intact, Place the grape in the microwave and crank up the microwave radiation. Viola, the grape bursts into a brilliant, white-hot flame. The same effect occurs with two grapes in a microwave that touch each other. The flame you see is plasma – a hot mixture of electrons and electrically charged atoms, or ions. Scientists only recently discovered why the grapes burst into flames. They used to think grapes acted like antennas, collecting microwaves. Now they understand that grapes in a microwave act as resonators, not antennas. Like a musical instrument that resonant sound waves, a grape in a microwave resonates microwave radiation. In other words, the waves of radiation get trapped inside…
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Weather

What plant is best for offsetting global warming and combating climate change?

Global warming, or “climate change” is a manmade catastrophe for our planet. It is mainly caused by our emissions of CO2 (carbon dioxide) which is created when we burn fuel in cars and power plants that generate electricity. In short, we pull substances rich with CO2 from deep inside the earth ( oil) and when burned, release CO2 and other gases into the air. The gases act like an insulating blanket around the planet which keeps heat from the Sun inside our atmosphere and thus warming the planet. The production of carbon dioxide and other “greenhouse gases” is further worsened by our purposeful destruction of trees. It is common for entire forests to be cleared for development of housing, shopping centers, and roads and highways.…
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Space

NASA launches fastest manmade object in history – Parker Solar Probe will travel more than 400,000 miles per hour and “touch” the Sun!

It hasn’t made it into the popular news channels much which is puzzling (and sad) because the device, and its mission, is so very, very cool. On August 12, 2018, NASA will launch the Parker Solar Probe, a car-sized spacecraft with a mission to examine the Sun’s corona. It’s no small feat and will require the probe maintain speeds of 430,000 miles per hour as it whirls around the sun. The Polar Solar Probe is an attempt to unravel some of the mystery around the Sun’s corona, that layer of hot plasma that floats millions of miles around the sun. The corona is the source of the Sun’s solar wind and is what causes the beautifully, colorful aurorae in the Earth’s magnetosphere. Parker's mission is…
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Weather

NASA’s 20-year satellite-time-lapse of the planet shows a earth breathing as the climate changes

The geeks at NASA released a time-lapse photo revealing how our planet has changed over the past two decades.  The photos were taken from NASA satellites that continuously monitor populations of plant life on land and in the oceans.  The ocean color changes are caused by changing populations of phytoplankton (purple is low population numbers and yellow is high).  If it looks like the planet is breathing - well it is!  NASA stated: That's the Earth, that is it breathing every single day, changing with the seasons, responding to the sun, to the changing winds, ocean currents and temperatures. The space-based view of life allows scientists to monitor crop, forest and fisheries health around the globe. As NASA begins its third decade of measurements, these…
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Animal Kingdom

Natures way to spread plant life – birds, bees, and… goats in trees that spit seeds?

It’s not unusual to see birds in trees. Pigeons in trees are a common sight in New York City. In Texas, noisy finch crowd trees along scenic roadways. In Washington, , vultures loom in trees waiting the opportunity to swoop down on unassuming middle-class citizens. But in south-western Morocco, hungry goats perch with acrobat-like agility high above the ground eating fruit and leaves and spitting out seeds. Goats? In trees? Spitting seeds? Goats in the boughs of trees are a common site in dry, arid areas like Spain and Mexico where edible ground-plants are harder for the goats to find. But the goats in trees in Morocco tower above all others. Locals say it’s common for 10-20 goats at a time to climb argan trees…
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Animal Kingdom

After decades of obscurity, scientists again discover the weird-looking “faceless fish” off coast of Australia

  It hasn’t seen or been seen in a long, long time. Last week the “faceless fish”, uh, showed its face in Australian waters for the first time in over 100 years. It has long been thought to be extinct. Australian scientists discovered the faceless creature about 13,000 feet below the surface during an expedition off Australia’s east coast. At first, scientists didn’t recognize the little guy. They thought it was a new species and were about to report it as such when the cook stumbled from the galley to see what all the commotion was about and with a disgusted look on his face, proclaimed, “Dang, I haven’t seen one of those in a long time.” The faceless fish, more accurately termed Typhlonus nasus…
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Technology

Grab the RAID! Check out US military’s creepy swarm of deadly flying drones.

  First we had giant rail guns, then killer robots, and now creepy deadly swarms of automated drones – all for the purpose of protecting the United States and giving little kids nightmares. What is a Perdix drone? The Perdix drone, or more accurately, micro-drone, was designed by the geniuses at MIT in 2013. Each drone has a wingspan of only 12 inches with tiny 2 ½ inch propellers. They are fast, nimble, and can fly for about 30 minutes on a single charge. What they do Perdix drones fly in swarms – large groups of tiny drones flying close together. The drones communicate with other drones in the swarm. This lets them act like a collective organism, similar to a swarm of bees or…
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Animal Kingdom

Say it isn’t so Reeko – a world without giraffes?!?!

  Sorry kids, but that lovable knock-kneed doofus we call giraffes may soon be no more. Today the International Union for Conversation of Nature classified the crane-necked creature as “vulnerable” meaning it’s at a high risk for extinction. If humans don’t change their behavior, the only giraffe we’ll ever see is between the covers of a book (yeah, they’re almost extinct too). The giraffe joins the elephant, orangutan, bees, and coral as creatures that may soon face extinction. Their disappearance comes amidst the loss of habitat, varying degrees of devastating climate change, and illegal poaching. The director of Stanford University’s Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve told CNN we have at the most, 20 years to change the way we treat nature or we will bring about…
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